[JA] Translating a blog post into Japanese


#1

Hi,

A blog post Why does decentralization matter? is good article. So I am translating it into Japanese and intend to publish it. Can anyone advise me for some points below?

First. How should I do it? Is it good for me to sign up for Official Mastodon GitLab and create a merge request to add my translation? Or, should I publish it on other site?

Second. What should the date property of the translation post be? 2018-12-30(the date of the original post) or 2019-01-XX(the date I will send the merge request)?

Third. I have some questions on the post and want to ask the author Gargron. Where should I do? Here Discourse? GitLab? Or by mensions on Mastodon?

Thanks.


#2

Hmm… I don’t think our blog posts are currently localizable, so I think publishing it on another site and then creating a merge request that edits the original with a link to the translation is probably the best place to go

Here or Discord (which you have access to as a Patreon subscriber) is probably the best place to ask questions about the post.


#3

Thank you for your quick reply!

I don’t think our blog posts are currently localizable,

What does localizable mean? I think it’s enough to add the page https://blog.joinmastodon.org/ja/2018/12/why-does-decentralization-matter/ (the path is prefixed by /ja) by adding a file content/posts/2018-12-30_Why-does-decentralization-matter/index.ja.md and it’s achieved by slightly editing the config file:

diff --git a/config.toml b/config.toml
index 139219d..950132c 100644
--- a/config.toml
+++ b/config.toml
@@ -1,5 +1,13 @@
 baseURL = "http://blog.joinmastodon.org/"
 languageCode = "en-us"
+DefaultContentLanguage = "en"
+[languages]
+  [languages.en]
+    languageName = "English"
+    weight = 1
+  [languages.ja]
+    languageName = "日本語"
+    weight = 2
 title = "Official Mastodon Blog"
 paginate = 6
 preserveTaxonomyNames = true

You know, this doesn’t add switching language feature and so on, but I think it’s okay for now.

This is just a proposal that I could edit Hugo config and then send a merge request for convenience for Japanese people. Because it’s your site, I won’t send a merge request if you think it is not proper and will find another place to publish(I’m thinking write.as and Medium). I don’t mind it at all.

Here or Discord (which you have access to as a Patreon subscriber) is probably the best place to ask questions about the post.

Thanks for the advice. I will ask him here later.

Thanks.


#4

I’m not sure how useful it is without the switching language feature, but if you say it’s an easy config change, that sounds good to me. Not sure what @Gargron’s thoughts are.


#5

Thank you! I’m waiting for Gargron, preparing questions to him.


#6

Hi @Gargron,

Let me ask two questions on your blog post Why does decentralization matter? for translation into Japanese.

Question 1

A decentralized network like the fediverse allows different user interfaces, different software, different forms of government to co-exist and cooperate.

Which does “to co-exist and cooperate” detail, only the phrase “different forms of government”, or whole three phrases “different user interfaces, different software, different forms of government”?

Question 2

You wrote:

Twitter’s regular blocks of Turkish activists.

What does this sentence mean?

  1. Twitter regularly blocks Turkish activists.
  2. Twitter is regularly blocked by Turkish activists.

If it does mean (2), it makes sence to me because I know Twitter was banned in Turky, for example, in 1994. But if it does mean (1), I don’t know that case because Japanese media didn’t cover it and I couldn’t English news on it at all now.

Thanks.


#7

I can answer both of these. The meaning of the first sentence is that “different user interfaces, different software, and different forms of government” are all things that can co-exist and cooperate on a federated network.

For question 2, the meaning is (1). Gargron is making the statement that Twitter (the corporation) regularly blocks activists (people who speak out against their government) that live Turkey (With the implication being that Twitter is contributing to Turkey’s authoritarian police-state). I’m not aware of any support for this statement—the best I could find was Twitter complies with Turkey's request, ban lifted | Reuters, which is...... definitely more of a gray area, and seems to be a one-time thing.

I don’t understand this sentence. Twitter did not exist in 1994.


#8

Thank you so much!

I’m not aware of any support for this statement—the best I could find was Twitter complies with Turkey’s request, ban lifted | Reuters, which is… definitely more of a gray area, and seems to be a one-time thing.

Your description and link is helpful. I didn’t know and got shocked about that… Yes, I understand it’s a gray area.

because I know Twitter was banned in Turky, for example, in 1994

I don’t understand this sentence. Twitter did not exist in 1994.

Turkey authority blocked access of Turkish people to Twitter. For instance, see Turkey Bans Twitter

Now I can finish the first revision of my translation and get started to brush it up. Thank you always, @nightpool!


#9

because I know Twitter was banned in Turky, for example, in 1994

Ah, sorry, I’ve mistaken! Of course it’s not 1994, but 2014. I got laugh out of the mistake!


#10

I have finished translation and sent a merge request: Translation of 2018-12-30 article into Japanese (!4) · Merge Requests · mastodon / blog · GitLab

Can you consider to merge this request?

Thanks.